Living in the Here and Now

By Rev. Sandra Wayne Campbell
Using the Power of Life to Live in the Here and Now

How the power of life can help us find abundance

My dear friend Carol answers everyone who asks how she is doing with a smile and five simple words: “I’m blessed no matter what!”

I have known Carol for nearly 40 years. She recently celebrated 80 years, and like for most people, those years have been marked by joy and sorrow.

At one time, she was a single parent with five children, working two jobs to give them the best life she could. Carol put herself through cosmetology school and became a master in the trade. I know because I’m one of many who benefit from her amazing talent.

She met and married the love of her life, and Emmet turned heaven and earth to give Carol and her children the best he could.

Carol and her mother had a special bond, and they could pass for twins. When Carol’s mother made her transition, Carol was devastated.

Not long after, Emmet lost his life in a one-car accident.

Carol sees to it that she and her children, their spouses, grandchildren, and extended family are all very close. She and the family experienced another shocking blow when the son of her oldest daughter suddenly passed away.

Before her husband passed, he and Carol had been working on plans for her to retire. That all changed due to the economy so, to my delight, Carol continues to take care of those of us who rely on her magic to make us beautiful.

My friend Carol has a positive outlook on life. That is why she can affirm with certainty, I’m blessed no matter what!

Choosing Your Perspective

Each of us has our own concept of life. Whether it is good or bad is all about perspective.

As Rev. David Williamson, D.Min., explains in Twelve Powers in You (Health Communications, 2000), one person may believe life is limited, death is the end of life, and sickness and disease are natural occurrences that we must suffer through. Yet another may see life as infinite and ongoing, health as natural, and life to be celebrated.

We can choose the perspective from which we view life.

In John 10:10, Jesus explains these different perspectives: “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.”

I believe the thief represents our negative, limited thoughts and beliefs that steal our joy, kill our faith, and destroy our zest for life. Those who cling to such ideas believe life is limited and measured in years, comes from the body, which gets old, wears out, gets sick, and dies.

The second part of the scripture reminds us that life is good and we can stay centered on our abundance of good no matter what.

Live Life Abundantly

That is the more constructive view of our life power—that life is an endless power and an infinite endowment of God, that the body comes from life, that death is a transition from one phase of life expression to another (a change of cosmic address), and that eternal life is always—here and now.

The forms of life may change, but our connection with life is ageless, no matter what.

That is the more constructive view of our life power—that life is an endless power and an infinite endowment of God, that the body comes from life, that death is a transition from one phase of life expression to another (a change of cosmic address), and that eternal life is always—here and now.

In the words of Unity poet laureate James Dillet Freeman, “Our life did not begin with birth, it is not of the earth; and this that we call death, it is no more than the opening and closing of a door …”

We all have the power to live life abundantly. You may not be able to control the “no matter what’s,” but you do have the power to stay centered on the truth that life is good and you are blessed, no matter what!

You have a choice every single day.

I choose to feel blessed.

I choose to feel grateful.

I choose to be excited.

I choose to be thankful.

I choose to be happy.

—Amber Housley


Rev. Sandra Campbell

Rev. Sandra Campbell is associate minister at Unity Temple on the Plaza in Kansas City, Missouri, and executive director of the Unity Urban Ministerial School.